How Does Learning Fit into Living?

8 August 2022 Contributor Blog
Thumbnail image for How Does Learning Fit into Living?

Written by guest blogger Dale Tracy. I have a set of interrelated questions that I am always working on answering in my teaching, researching, writing, and living. I’ll take the opportunity to list them

READ MORE

COVID-19 and the Higher Education Workplace: Creating a Community of Care to Address Burnout and Employee Turnover

4 August 2022 Contributor Blog
Thumbnail image for COVID-19 and the Higher Education Workplace: Creating a Community of Care to Address Burnout and Employee Turnover

By: Jake D. Winfield & Joseph H. Paris
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended workplaces of all kinds, as work shifted online for many workers to provide safety. Our study of higher education working conditions in the United States during October 2020 highlighted the numerous ways that these changing work environments were associated with burnout and increased turnover intentions.

READ MORE

On Co-Authorship in Research/Creation

26 July 2022 Contributor Blog
Thumbnail image for On Co-Authorship in Research/Creation

Groundworks collaborators take a seat on Mount St. Helena / KanamotaFeatured (L to R): Sophie Traub, Michael Jaguar, Desirae Harp, Kenny Ray Ramos, Tiśina ParkerPhoto Credit: Ian Garrett Written by guest blogger Ian Garrett. Research/Creation, in which the creative process is a key research methodology, is an essential part of my own research and what feels like […]

READ MORE

Reflecting on Indo-Afro
Racial Tensions in Trinidad

20 July 2022 Contributor Blog
Thumbnail image for Reflecting on Indo-Afro<br> Racial Tensions in Trinidad

Written by guest blogger Heidi McKenzie. I research and render through my art the lives of Indo-Caribbean indentured workers – my father’s ancestors. This is a little-known history: approximately one million South Asians were shipped to the British colonies in order to fill the void of unwaged labour for the cash crops – largely sugar – when the British emancipated their African slaves in 1834…

READ MORE

Why Bioethics Should Engage the Cynic

11 July 2022 Contributor Blog
Thumbnail image for Why Bioethics Should Engage the Cynic

Written by guest bloggers Catalina González Quintero and Allison B. Wolf In “What the World Needs Now, Is Hume, Sweet Hume,” I (Wolf) primarily used Catalina González’s book, Academic Skepticism in Hume and Kant to reflect on the relationship between different types of skepticism and debates about Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy. Since then, González has started […]

READ MORE

The Gastromythology of English Tea Culture: On the UKTC’s Advertisements and Making Tea a “Fact” of English Life

4 July 2022 Contributor Blog
Thumbnail image for The Gastromythology of English Tea Culture: On the UKTC’s Advertisements and Making Tea a “Fact” of English Life

In this UTP Journals Blog post, Arup K. Chatterjee, a Professor at OP Jindal Global University, expands on his research article in the Canadian Journal of History entitled “The Gastromythology of English Tea Culture: On the UKTC’s Advertisements and Making Tea a ‘Fact’ of English Life.’”

READ MORE

Imagination and Everyday Performance

4 April 2022 Contributor Blog

“Pierogi-making at a Polish Canadian cultural centre”—photo by the author.
Written by guest blogger Wiktor Kulinski.

When we think of theatre, from the traditional to the experimental, we imagine staged performances that are composed and exhibited within constraints.

READ MORE

Partial Ectogenesis and the Protection of Autonomy: Thinking Beyond the Law

21 March 2022 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Anna Nelson, PhD Candidate, University of Manchester.

My article in the International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (IJFAB) comes from my doctoral research about the relationship between partial ectogenesis (PE)—the procedure whereby a fetus is extracted from the human uterus, and transferred to an artificial uterus to complete gestation ex utero —and the autonomy of the pregnant person.

READ MORE

Build Student Confidence Through Authentic Learning Experiences

7 March 2022 Contributor Blog

Written by guest bloggers Laura March & Maggie Melo.

Can LIS curricula dedicated to makerspaces provide an authentic learning experience for future librarians interested in makerspace-adjacent careers? Our article, “By the Book: A Pedagogy of Authentic Learning Experiences for Emerging Makerspace Information Professionals,” illustrates how educators can use an authentic learning framework to help narrow the preparation gap in makerspaces.

READ MORE

Smørrebrød Scholarship, or: Being More Open-Faced in Research

21 February 2022 Contributor Blog


Written by guest blogger David Szanto.
Resume: Staff of Life reflects on the ways in which performance with food can be a way to explore life and death, the preservation of memory, and the creation of new relationships between people and food. Three performances are described, each using bread starter culture that is more than twenty-five years old, and which was inherited from a friend of the author.

READ MORE