Big Ideas for a Stronger, Cleaner Economy

by Lauren Naus on November 30, 2016

Written by the Smart Prosperity Institute on the release of the special November issue of Canadian Public Policy, which you can access here for free!


 
bloggy banner 2We are excited to be guest editors for the new special issue of Canadian Public Policy Journal (CPP) – “Big Ideas for Sustainable Prosperity: Policy Innovation for Greening Growth.”

Recognizing that Canada needs to accelerate its shift to a cleaner and more sustainable economy, we brought together a group of prominent environment and economy experts for a two-day conference at the University of Ottawa, and we asked them to share their “big ideas” on driving Canada’s green growth transition. In collaboration with Canadian Public Policy Journal, we are releasing a special issue that captures the ideas and discussion coming out from that conference.

The authors wrote the papers featured in this special issue specifically as big think pieces to help spur new ideas and research questions — and as such they do not conform to typical academic articles. Rather than focusing on presenting new research (although this could help inform their arguments), we asked them to identify policy challenges or changes needed to drive greener growth, as well as point to key research questions that might help inform these changes.

The release of this special issue comes just as we’ve changed our name from Sustainable Prosperity to Smart Prosperity Institute – and it could not come at a better time. The ten papers presented in this issue reflect some of the “big ideas” that have shaped our new and expanded mandate. This journal release represents a turning point for our organization. The articles both capture what we’ve learned during the past eight years – such as the important role that market-based instruments can play in creating price signals – as well as frames a number of new policy horizons, including accelerating clean innovation and promoting the accurate valuation of natural capital.

As you explore the “big ideas” proposed by some of Canada’s leading thinkers on the environment and the economy, you will get a sense of some of the exciting and timely directions that Smart Prosperity Institute will go in the coming months and years.

We would like to express our heartfelt appreciation to all authors and reviewers, as well as the Canadian Public Policy Journal team for making this special issue a reality.

We also gratefully acknowledge financial support for this special issue by Natural Resources Canada and the University of Ottawa, as well as core support for the Sustainable Prosperity Research and Policy Network from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, and the Ontario Ministry of Environment.

Click here to access videos and presentations from the Big Ideas conference, and follow the Smart Prosperity Institute on Twitter @SP_Inst!

This piece was originally posted on the Smart Prosperity Institute blog.

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The Physical Performance of Politics

by Lauren Naus on November 28, 2016

Written by guest blogger, Greg Koabel


CJH_51_2_coverIn the personal world of early modern politics, political identities were performed by men (for the most part), and mediated through audiences within a shared space and physical immediacy. “The Treasonous Hat” explores just such a contested performance, as the Earl of Strafford fought for his life before an audience of England’s political elite during his treason trial through March and April 1641.

Strafford’s posture, dress, tone of voice, and behavior were all minutely observed and interpreted by an audience seeking to determine Strafford’s political character — a practice which is not unfamiliar to observers of election campaigns of the 21st century. The nobles, members of parliament, and the crowd of Londoners packed into Westminster Hall to watch the trial were participants in a political world deeply rooted in the physical, encompassing the senses of sight, sound and even — within the crowded scaffolding specially erected for the trial — the senses of touch, taste and smell.

Greg Koabel PictureGreg Koabel, University of Regina

Robert Baillie, a Scotsman watching with hundreds of others within Westminster Hall, complained that “the gravitie [was] not such as I expected”. Rather than an organized and solemn resolution of the kingdom’s affairs Baillie found “oft great clamour without about the doors; in the intervalles, while Strafford was making readie for answers, the Lords gott always to their feet, walked and clattered; the Lower House men too loud clattering; after ten houres much plublict eating, not onlie of confections, bot of flesh and bread, bottles of beer and wine going thick from mouth to mouth without cups, and all this in the King’s eye”. Finally, Baillie lamented that many of his fellow patrons “turned their back, and lett water goe through the formes [benches] they satt on”. Ten hours of eating and drinking, without the ability to leave the closed doors of the hall, forced the realities of the human body into proceedings.

Baillie’s disillusionment with the lack of dignity with which the political elite performed their roles, and the vulgarity of their audience are perhaps familiar in the political world of 2016 as well. Where Baillie might have hoped for the politics of abstract ideas, he found himself in a political world where identities were expressed through, and rooted in, the human body.


Greg Koabel’s article, “The Treasonous Hat: Interpreting Gesture in the Treason Trial of the Earl of Strafford” is available inside Vol. 51, Issue 2 of the Canadian Journal of History/Annales canadiennes d’histoire. Read it at CJH/ACH Online or on Project MUSE.

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To celebrate our participation in the 5th annual University Press Week blog tour, we’re looking back at the future of online publishing in the journals industry! Yes, you read that right…we’re “looking back at the future.” In this #UPWeek post, we look back at our very first online platform as well as flash forward to our current platform. Take a look at all the advancements that have been made and not only how far digital journals publishing has come, but the online reading community!

In 2006, the first of UTP’s journals were made available online. These titles included the Canadian Historical Review, Cartographica, Canadian Journal of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Canadian Public Policy, Journal of Scholarly Publishing, the Journal of Veterinary and Medical Education, and University of Toronto Quarterly. Back then, the functionality of our online platform was nothing compared to what it is today. It simply acted as a content host, users would visit the site, find the journal they subscribe to, and downloaded their content. There was not a lot of opportunity to personalize the users experience, therefore leaving it very difficult to build an online reading community. No tools for advertising, web design, and specialized access options were available. Nevertheless, it was an exciting time and digitizing our first journals meant new opportunities were on the horizon. Take a look at what the Canadian Historical Review page looked like in 2012:

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Online platforms have come quite a way since then. In 2015, our journals migrated to Atypon’s Literatum platform which opened the door to interacting and building relationships with our readers at a more advanced level. Some of our publications even have customized websites which give them the capability to customize each user’s experience specific to that journal’s branding. With the migration came a whole new list features to improve each reader’s experience as well as a multitude of new capabilities such as website development tools, content targeting, rapid product creation, subscription modeling, eCommerce, and analytics. Each of these new tools have played a key role in improving our digital marketing strategy in order to reach readers. Users now have the ability to see which journal articles are the most cited and most downloaded, receive customizable Tables of Contents alerts, share research on social media, and access a rich mobile experience. In addition, Literatum supports several standards that researchers and librarians expect to find on a comprehensive publishing platform, including ORCID, CrossRef, CrossCheck, JATS DTD, Shibboleth, COUNTER, and MARC. Needless to say, the developments made in this field within the last decade or so has revolutionized the scholarly readers experience, and it can only get better from here!

Feel free to explore our new website if you haven’t already (www.utpjournals.press) or you can take a look at some featured images below:

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University Press Week 2016: UP Staff Spotlight

by Lauren Naus on November 16, 2016

We’re thrilled to once again be one of over 40 presses participating in this years UP Week Blog Tour. Each day this week, presses will be blogging on a different theme that highlights the value of collaboration among the scholarly community. Each day, we will round up of all the university presses that posted on that day. Today’s presses have shared a post featuring a University Press staff member’s involvement in the scholarly community. Check out all the “UP Staff Spotlight” posts below. Stay tuned for our post coming this Thursday!

Wednesday November 16, 2016: UP Staff Spotlight

Seminary Co-op Bookstores: John Eklund
Wayne State University Press: Rachel Ross
University of Washington Press: Niccole Leilanionapae‘āina Coggins on community and food sovereignty
University Press of Mississippi: Valerie Jones
University of Wisconsin Press: A community of printmakers: Wisconsin & UW Press
Johns Hopkins Univ. Press: Why I Work at a University Press
University of Chicago Press: Levi Stahl on community and the Parker novels

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University Press Week 2016: Indie Bound

by Lauren Naus on November 15, 2016

We’re thrilled to once again be one of over 40 presses participating in this years UP Week Blog Tour. Each day this week, presses will be blogging on a different theme that highlights the value of collaboration among the scholarly community. Each day, we will round up of all the university presses that posted on that day. Today’s presses have shared a post featuring the bookstore community. Check out all the “Indie Bound” posts below. Stay tuned for our post coming this Thursday!

Tuesday November 15, 2016: Indie Bound

University of Texas Press: Find Community at Your Local Independent Bookstore
Cornell University Press: It Takes a Village: Eight Tips for Surviving in the Age of Amazon
University Press of Colorado: Bookstores We Love
Seminary Co-op Bookstores: Selections from The Front Table
McGill-Queen’s University Press: For University Press Week, let us now praise the booksellers
Duke University Press: Governor Jerry Brown, City Lights Bookstore, and a Bulgarian Adventure
NYU Press: Brooklyn Book Festival Recap
University Press of Kentucky: #ReadUP in the Community: IndieBound in Kentucky
University Press of Kansas: An Ode to the Independents

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University Press Week 2016: The People in Our Neighborhood

November 14, 2016

We’re thrilled to once again be one of over 40 presses participating in this years UP Week Blog Tour. Each day this week, presses will be blogging on a different theme that highlights the value of collaboration among the scholarly community. Each day, we will round up of all the university presses that posted on […]

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Further Thoughts on “Social Fates”

November 7, 2016
Thumbnail image for Further Thoughts on “Social Fates”

Written by guest blogger, Margaret Morganroth Gullette @gullette_mm   The history of medical stigma more or less tracks the history of many frightening and fatal communicable diseases, during the period when etiology is unknown, and even after the cause is known, if the disease is long considered incurable. Syphilis, HIV/AIDS, and now Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) […]

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Our Friday Feature for #OAWeek is on Canadian Public Policy!

October 28, 2016
Thumbnail image for Our Friday Feature for #OAWeek is on Canadian Public Policy!

Our final feature for Open Access Week 2016 is dedicated to Canadian Public Policy (CPP), Canada’s foremost journal examining economic and social policy! The aim of the journal is to stimulate research and discussion of public policy problems in Canada. It is a great resource for a wide readership including decision makers and advisers in […]

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Today’s OA Week Feature is on IJFAB: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics!

October 27, 2016
Thumbnail image for Today’s OA Week Feature is on <i>IJFAB: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics</i>!

Today, we continue our celebration of Open Access Week 2016 by shining the spotlight on IJFAB: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics, which offers a ton of OA content!   IJFAB is the leading forum in bioethics for feminist thought and debate. The journal welcomes feminist scholarship from any discipline on ethical issues related […]

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Up Next for OA Week is the National Gallery of Canada Review!

October 26, 2016
Thumbnail image for Up Next for OA Week is the <i>National Gallery of Canada Review</i>!

Today, we are shining the spotlight on another fully open access journal in our collection, the National Gallery of Canada Review (NGCR)!   Originally published in print from 2000 to 2008, the NGCR is a vibrant online, open access resource that features the investigations and scholarly engagements of prominent curators and art historians with the […]

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