“Indigenous Cinema and Media in the Americas: Storytelling, Communities, and Sovereignties”: virtual launch at the Montreal First Peoples’ Festival Présence autochtone

11 August 2020 Contributor Blog

This blog post is from a conversation between André Dudemaine, Director of the Montreal First Peoples’ Festival Présence autochtone, and Isabelle St-Amand, Assistant Professor at Queen’s University, August 8, 2020 via Skype.

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Moving Drama Online

10 August 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Sue Proctor.

I currently teach a drama class for adults with intellectual disabilities at Inclusion Winnipeg. In March, with the coming of the pandemic, drama classes and shows were all cancelled. Like the university, we moved the class online and everything changed.

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From Submission to Publication: The Linda F. Dietz Graduate Essay Prize

4 August 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Matthew Barrett.

I am honoured to receive CJH’s Dietz Essay Prize for my article, “Conduct Unbecoming an Officer and a Doctor: Medical Attitudes toward Homosexuality and the Court Martial of Dr. Percy Ryberg.” The article examines the Second World War case of an RCAF medical officer charged for renting a London apartment with airmen later accused of homosexual activities.

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The Printed Book is Still Thriving

27 July 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Matt Baehr.

I had the pleasure of writing an article in May about Book Manufacturing during the Covid-19 pandemic. We are now in July and things are continuing to evolve. Schools are starting to make their decisions about fall classes. The American Academy of Pediatrics has pushed for schools to open with students physically present.

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Indigenous Oral Health, COVID-19, and the Treaty Obligation to Health Care

20 July 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest bloggers Catherine Carstairs and Ian Mosby.

Today, Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island are facing the threat of COVID-19. The Navajo Nation has the highest per-capita infection rate in the United States – higher even than the hard-hit states of New York and New Jersey.

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Film Ratings Still Matter

13 July 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Tim Covell.

Film ratings, or movie age classifications, seem a quaint relic of a bygone era. Whereas you once had to lie about your age to a ticket clerk to see forbidden content, now you simply check “Yes, I am 18” – if the web site bothers to ask.

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Writing Louis Riel

6 July 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Albert Braz.

The Métis politician, poet, and mystic Louis Riel (1844-1885) is one of the most compelling figures in Canadian history. After having been hanged for treason by the Canadian state, he has been transformed into nothing less than the quintessential Canadian hero.

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The political and economic roots of Canada’s “isotopes crisis”

29 June 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Mahdi Khelfaoui.

Radioactive isotopes are used each year in several million medical procedures worldwide. For instance, iodine-131 is applied in the treatment of thyroid disease, iridium-192 in radiotherapy, and xenon-133 in lung imaging.

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Theatre Research in Canada / Recherches théâtrales au Canada Joins University of Toronto Press Journals

26 June 2020 Contributor Blog

Four Theatre Research in Canada covers.

The Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance Studies, University of Toronto is pleased to announce that Theatre Research in Canada/Recherches théâtrales au Canada (TRIC/RTAC) has moved operations to the University of Toronto Press.

Theatre Research in Canada/Recherches théâtrales au Canada is Canada’s only peer-reviewed journal with an explicit focus on Canadian and Québécois theatre in both official languages.

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Predatory Journals and Academic Promotion

22 June 2020 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger Fiona McQuarrie.

Like many Canadian academics, my co-authors and I regularly receive annoying spam emails from predatory journals inviting us to submit our research. That annoyance sparked our initial interest in looking more closely at these journals. We were curious about how they managed to survive, especially when there is widespread agreement that these journals are a “global threat” that “promote shoddy scholarship and waste resources”.

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