From Zombies to Christ, Bringing Darkness to Light

6 May 2019 Contributor Blog
Dark photo of a man staring at a light bulb.

Written by guest blogger James R. Crooke. Zombies, as we know them in pop-culture—apocalyptic, cannibalistic, infectious-plague monsters —were first depicted in George A. Romero’s 1968 film, Night of the Living Dead, which pioneered an entirely new horror genre: the zombie apocalypse. This was the first time zombies communicated, and they have been communicating meaningfully ever […]

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The Origin and Development of “Strange Bedfellows”

29 April 2019 Contributor Blog
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Written by guest blogger Wayne Batten. Readers may well wonder how I became interested in this topic. When I somewhat belatedly realized how the internet had changed the conditions under which pornography is accessed and viewed, my reaction, particularly in light of my concern for young people who would likely encounter it, was a combination […]

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The Journal of Education Human Resources Joins the University of Toronto Press Journals

25 April 2019 UTP News
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University of Toronto Press is pleased to announce that the Journal of Education Human Resources (JEHR), formerly known as the Journal of School Public Relations (JSPR), has joined UTP’s Journals publishing program. The Journal of Education Human Resources is a quarterly publication providing research, analysis, case studies, and field-based commentary on human resource issues in […]

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A General Good Time

22 April 2019 Contributor Blog
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Written by guest blogger Matthew Smith. Judging children’s behaviour is largely a matter of perspective.  Whether we see certain childhood behaviours as positive or negative often boils down to our particular viewpoint and, crucially, how said behaviour impinges on us, the adult.  As I suggest in “Snips and Snails,” perceptions of positive and negative childhood […]

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Notes on Ethnographic Situations in Vietnamese American Communities

12 April 2019 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger An Tuan Nguyen. Southern California, May 2012: Standing in a parking lot of a motel where I stayed for several weeks during one of my field visits were three young informants and I. All three of them were my former students in Ho Chi Minh City between 2008 and 2009. They […]

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“Inside the box, outside the box, and among boxes”

19 February 2019 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger, Steven C. Muir. People are encouraged to “think outside the box,” and while this is worthwhile advice, it does not tell the whole story of doing effective and innovative research.  Below are some observations on this process, and how I go about it.  These issues were at work in my article […]

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“Flicking switches, turning dials, and pressing buttons”: The important work of energy historians

4 February 2019 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger, Andrew Watson. I don’t think it’s too much of a cliché to say that most of us have only the vaguest idea what the origins are of the energy we consume on a daily basis. Many of us living in the world’s industrialized countries have it hammered into our daily lives […]

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Raised on Oil: From Childhood Memories to Research on Port City Refineries and the Global Petroleumscape

29 January 2019 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger, Carola Hein. Among my early childhood memories are Esso items. My father worked for the German branch of the parent company, Exxon, an American oil company. He would often bring home collectible sticker images of wild animals or fish that I could collect in albums published by Esso. From the small […]

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The emotional energy consumer

21 January 2019 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger, Rebecca K. Wright. Ever since the recent IPCC report was published in October 2018 I have had a sick feeling in my stomach. Talking to others it is clear that the emotions I have experienced, from dread to depression, are not unique. Instead, a range of ‘emotional cultures’ are structuring our […]

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Canada’s Shifting Energy Sources: A Comparison with eight European Countries, 1870–2000

17 January 2019 Contributor Blog

Written by guest blogger, Richard W. Unger. Canadians are among the greatest consumers of energy per person in the world.  Iceland, with abundant geothermal sources and a small population, is the only country with a consistently higher level of energy use.  Even the people in the United States fall behind Canadians in consuming energy.  Those […]

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